Posts Tagged: visink

One Woman Project

The One Woman Project is a youth-lead, registered non-for-profit organisation focused upon education about and advocacy promoting gender equality. https://www.onewomanproject.org/

 Maeve Baker

Maeve Baker is an animator/illustrator. Maeve talked to Visible Ink about her involvement in the space, background and inspirations.

I have always been a draw-er and loved cartoons. During my final year of high school, I made an animated film out of paper which got a bit of attention and won a Creative Generations competition. My art teacher at the time suggested that I study animation, which I didn’t even know was possible, but which seemed to make so much sense to me. 2 years after school I began my Bachelor of Animation at the Queensland College of Art.

I first learn about Visible Ink when I needed to print and bind a 4-page comic for an exhibition in November 2016. A friend at uni said they did free printing and so a few of us went there to print our comics, not expecting very much other than printing. That afternoon I met the staff, who showed me around the art area and explained all of the facilities available at VisInk. I was back the following week to paint.

I have 3 comics underway which I pushed aside during the uni semester, which I hope to finish off and distribute to comic shops in Brisbane. I have also got a couple of short animation projects to complete for the Brisbane Feminist festival organised by the One Woman Project. I’m hoping to finish several large scale paintings and then have an exhibition before the end of the year.

I love being able to create a small world with characters and environments that aren’t real. I like the fact that looking at someone’s animation and drawings is like looking at someone’s dreams in that every aspect of the work is a piece of the artist. Even just a single piece of paper can contain so much information about a person and I love being able to share that. Often you communicate things through art that you can’t speak with words.
Also I think that animation is just magical- moving drawings, whhaaat?!

I have always drawn been interested in cartoons and comics, even when it felt inappropriate to still be watching ABCKids as a teenager. My parents always encouraged my artwork, providing me with paper, pens, pencils and paint to ensure that I kept up the hobby. The more I drew, the more I got associated as a draw-er and the more people would come to me to ask for designs or to collaborate on projects. As I met more and more people with an interest in art and animation, I realised that it is actually a thing and that if you work hard enough you can draw for a living. This is now my project, to try and establish myself as an artist so that I can create animation, drawings and paintings 100% of the time. I’ve not found anything else that has brought me as much joy as creating art, so I’m just going to run with it for now and try to make it work.

What I create for money are specific to the brief given by the person commissioning me, the things I make in my spare time have the potential to be completely limitless, abstract and weird. I still struggle with this, but it’s really fun.
I also like swimming, yoga and reading, but mostly I just lie around, hanging out with my friends and watching 30Rock.

I wish I had pushed myself more in my earlier years when I decided to pursue art. I would draw maybe once a week and usually only as a necessity, for a uni project and never for my own pleasure. I wish I had nerded out on art more and created more because 1 it feels great and 2 it allows you to learn and progresses so quickly. It’s such a simple thing, but it can be so easy to let yourself off the hook and so hard to force yourself, but it’s necessary. Going to galleries or researching an artist whose work you really love is just as good. Look at and make as much art as you can and soon you won’t have to force yourself, it’ll be second nature.

I think the more people you meet and talk to about art, the richer your experience will be. There are so many little exhibitions, workshops and events happening all the time, you just have to know about them. I am definitely a more introverted person, but it has usually always paid off when I’ve put myself out there and gone along to art events happening in Brisbane. You meet inspiring people and see inspiring things and remember why you do it in the first place, it’s great.

maevebkr.com
instagram: @mastyp

First rehearsal down!

CR Productions are busily preparing for the Short and Sweet Festival in July.

To find out more about CR Productions check out their Facebook page: facebook.com/crtheatre

Badges galore

Did you know you can make badges at VI? We’ve even got three sizes. We’ve even made it easy with a tool to help get your artwork onto paper and into the badge press ASAP! What’s stopping you? Go badge crazy!!!

Madeline Price

Meet Madeline Price (22), long-term Visible Ink user, law AND arts student, UQ student ambassador, Vice President of Gender and Sexuality at UQ, avid rock climber, traveller, waterskiier, and generally a swell gal.

Currently Madeline’s main deal is as founder and director of the One Woman Project, a very cool not-for-profit organisation that most Brisbane feminists would be aware of. Madeline describes the One Woman Project as ‘a youth-led non-for-profit organisation dedicated to education about and advocacy promoting global gender equality’ who run ‘in-school educational workshops, state-wide campaigns, biannual conferences, engagement and outreach events, and external seminars about gender equality’.

As director, Madeline is in charge of managing 22 volunteers working on a number of events and activities, and a facilitation team which delivers in-school programs. The team is also currently working on a number of free engagement and outreach events, and an upcoming domestic violence awareness campaign. The One Woman Project has recently had a major success in selling out their upcoming mid-year conference ‘Brisbane’s Finest Feminists’ featuring workshops, panel discussions, live music, and networking.

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In addition to this, ‘We have just opened applications for our Semester 2 external seminar series’. This seminar series ‘is open to all university and high-school aged young people and covers such topics as; an introduction to gender and sex, women in music, women in sport, feminist philosophy, online trolling and cyberbullying, the medicalisation of birth, and more’.

‘I am constantly inspired by the hard work, commitment and passion of my fellow volunteers at the One Woman Project. Achieving global gender equality is a massive goal and sometimes it can feel unattainable – until I see the work that my team are putting in to achieve it…Every day I am inspired by my team of volunteers, who are passionate about changing the world’.

Prior to founding the One Woman Project, Madeline was still directing her energies towards bettering society – ‘I was heavily involved in Oaktree, Australia’s largest, youth-led aid and development advocacy organisation. Within Oaktree, from 2012 – 2014, I had a number of roles, including: Live Below the Line Insiders Coordinator, UQ Oaktree founder and President, Roadtrip to End Poverty facilitator and Community Leaders (Outreach) Coordinator’. As well as this, ‘back in 2009 I founded the Alternative to Schoolies Project. Through this Project we successfully had 15 students from the Gympie region travel to Cambodia and Thailand and partake in volunteer work for two weeks as an alternative to the traditional ‘Schoolies’ activities’.

Madeline seems to strive for perpetual improvement and evolvement on all scales. ‘Vis Ink needs to be bigger – we should have an entire office building dedicated to youth-led projects in Brisbane! The main thing that draws me to Visible Ink is that it is youth-focused and youth-driven. There are very few venues in Brisbane that prioritise youth-users and can facilitate ongoing projects and large-scale activities. The staff are always ready to lend a hand – or their expertise – and it is a positive, friendly and energetic environment.’

Find out more about Madeline:
www.onewomanproject.org,
www.madelineprice.org

Chris M

“I do everything at Visink! I tried working from home, but it’s never going to happen!”, Chris M. is tapping at a computer, scrolling through a feed listlessly, he’s trying to organise his latest meet-up project and we’re distracting him. Chris M is one of most regular space users, he shows up most days he’s able and has been doing so for a little over a year. Chris is an artist, his practice has multiple focuses, starting in photography and gradually including, drawing, sculpting, painting (anything with his hands).

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Chris came to Brisbane from Kingaroy, trained as a chef, but with a craving to do something creative. He went to Brisbane Youth Service to try out graffiti art, but it didn’t catch, so he started to scope out other kinds of art and wound up at the window at Visible Ink. Chris started drawing creatively a year ago and it’s become a compulsive activity, what he describes as “IMPULSE ART” – “It’s gotta be in existence”. Drawing is pretty new skill in repertoire, and although he’s always taken photos, Chris will essentially attempt any creative medium, considering himself a ‘free-form’ artist and taking an experimental approach through practice and collaboration. “Collaboration is what the world needs… it’s the new apprenticeship”.

Collaboration has been an underlying focus through Chris’ many projects, CHYLD – an attempt to provide an “escape where people can express themselves through photography without being ‘photography’”, PRIMARY ARCADE – a study based art group (“everyone studies design”) and main focus CREATIVE HANDS – the zine that never was, which became a meetup, which became art hopping, which became a place to share events and then back to a meetup!

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It’s Chris’ background with photography that got him involved in 2016 Brisbane Youth Week, where he was part of the team documenting the many events that took place in April. It was what he can only describe as a “life changing” experience, “it opened my eyes to opportunities and how I could work in the industry”. While he’s taken work previously as a creative it’s been hard to professionalise it, “I’ve always underpaid myself, but now I’ve learned to value myself, to value my time”.

Working as a contracted professional, Chris was able to build experience and confidence through working collaboratively with a diverse group of young creatives “I haven’t had the opportunities, so I got to see how I worked… It was good to have the trust”.

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Chris makes use of Visible Ink to “access the equipment I need”, it’s become his defacto studio, “it’s a safe & quiet working environment (when the office isn’t noisy)”, he uses our computers, internet, DSLR cameras, paints and canvases, and he’s incredibly productive. His debut solo exhibition ‘OUT OF PAPER’ at Deagon’s Artrageous was almost a sell out, with the premise to take his drawings and turn them into paintings, “it got me thinking about the future”.

Chris is embarking on a Film & Television course and has been recently experimenting with Video Art. His motivation, determination and adaptability gives him a pretty good shot at success.

mrmiddleton.xyz
instagram/mrmiddletonartist
facebook/mrmiddletonpage

 

Alana Potts

Alana first dropped into Visible Ink in 2015, joining her sister and collaborator in the creative project The Wildfolk Collective.  Since then her infectious personality has become a regular fixture around the space and this year Alana pulled out her camera to help us document Brisbane Youth Week festivities.

Working primarily in the field of photography in analogue and digital formats, her personal style is largely experimental, searching the abandoned and undiscovered for new ideas and inspiration (probably jumping a fence or two along the way)! Growing up in regional Byron Bay, her work is a reflection of her surrounds during youth, capturing the coastal climates, hills and hinterland of northern NSW as a backdrop for the reckless, the young, and the wild to roam free.

alana-landscape

Alana’s contributions to The Wildfolk Collective has resulted in her exhibiting a selection of her 35mm film exposures in a short series of zines; ‘salty’, ‘fresh’, ‘kick push coast’, and ‘sea sirens’.   The zines feature single and double exposures and self-processed negatives, and document the surf culture of her hometown, and has become the inspiration for a larger project ‘home’ – a short surf film exploring the art, surf, life and landscape.

Alana shoots in analogue and digital formats – 35mm, 120 and medium film formats and DSLR resolutions for both private and commercial, personal and contracted commissions — including videography, event photography, music/gig photography, studio/model photography & landscape photography and she is currently studying Advertising, Creative Writing, & Design.

Ibis

How did you hear about Visible Ink and why did you want to use our space?

I (Rhiana) heard about the space through a friend who suggested that we take advantage of the free printing on offer at Visible Ink.

We love the facilities and the support that we get from the staff, and the fact that such a space exists for the sole purpose of supporting young people and encouraging them to be creative and innovative. Overall, though, I’d say we’re in it for the free milo.

What are you currently working on project-wise?

We’re putting together our fourth issue (to be released on Christmas day, if all goes to plan), which entails organising our submissions, finalising our own inclusions and deciding on the look and feel we want for the issue. We’re also working on expanding our website and developing our new YouTube channel (IbisTV), so that we can display a broader range of content.

What do you do, why did you choose to go down that path, and what do you love about it?

We (myself, Jamie, Jack and Seamus) create and distribute a free zine called Ibis.

We all wanted a platform to showcase our own work and that of our friends and the wider community. We basically thought a free zine would be an awesome, inclusive way to encourage creativity, positivity, sharing and community in Brisbane. It’s also just really nice to dedicate time and attention to something that feels meaningful.

We love the freedom and the lack of constraint that comes with publishing our own zine – we have total creative freedom, can include and create whatever content we like, and we have a platform for our own work whenever we want it. We love receiving submissions, giving something to the community and the collaboration that working on the zine has brought us.

What would you say led you to where you are today?

I think we all love creating and sharing our work, and we’ve all been brought up to be very community minded. I’m about to graduate from a degree in creative and professional writing, Jamie’s graduating from a bachelor of journalism/history, Seamus studies visual arts and Jack studied animation, so the zine is a really practical way for us to gain experience in our chosen fields.

What do you get up to in your down time?

Jack does a lot of Simpson’s themed photoshopping; Seamus skates, surfs and creates for his visual arts degree at QUT; Jamie is learning calligraphy and his times tables; and I love watching movies, singing, dancing and eating (usually all at once).

Is there any advice you would give young people wanting to get involved/started in this field? Or any advice you wish you’d been given beforehand?

As our friend Shia Labeouf says: JUST DO IT. Making use of the free resources at Visible Ink is a great way to start out.

In terms of helpful advice I’d say… Make sure that you edit your zine really thoroughly before you distribute it. Also, try to be as organised as possible – keep tabs of all costs, numbers and anything that could possibly be important at a later date. Don’t just assume that you will remember it, because you probably won’t (or is that just me…?).

How would you suggest young people get involved? Or opportunities like this in Brisbane?

If you’d like to contribute to our zine, you can send your work to ibismagazine@gmail.com.

If you want to stay up to date with zine related events in Brisbane, check out the Zine and Indie Comic Symposium (ZICS) Facebook page, and if you’re interested in zines in general, I recommend paying a visit to Junky Comics in West End, which has a really cool collection of national and international zines and comics.

Is there anything else you’d like to add?

Where can people get in touch with you?

Email: ibismagazine@gmail.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/IBISzine/

Website: ibiszine.com