Posts Tagged: enterprise

Dylan Cattanach talks KB Theory

KB Theory are a Brisbane-based indie band blending pop-rock to create catchy melodies and bursts of pop with fun lyrics that have become a part of their signature sound. Dylan Cattanach, songwriter and lead vocalist chatted with us about their upcoming projects, getting started, and influences.

What would you say led you to where you are today?
I’ve grown up with music. My father is in a couple of cover bands with some other friends and my uncle is a muso. He’s has made a living from his music and I’ve always admired him. Either I’ve been hearing it live or on the radio my whole life.
I’m always sitting there tapping out a beat – annoying my family and friends – or picking out a new melody on the guitar or keyboard. I just love music and the beat. As soon as I realised I was comfortable bringing my songs and music to live audiences I’ve thrived on the buzz of entertaining.

Dylan met the band’s bassist, Campbell Harris, at Music Industry College, a school that is producing some of Australia’s best up and coming musicians. Both Dylan and Campbell got their musical grounding with the many influences happening around them. From there, drummer Andrew Barnes was introduced through mutual friends after working together on a local musical production, and on the look-out for a lead guitarist, Harry Verity joined KB Theory in late 2017.

“All the boys are just naturally gifted musicians who complement each other and we genuinely like hanging out together.”

KB Theory have a broad range of influences from The 1975, Last Dinosaurs and The Strokes, providing a beat to move to and a captivating, fun show to watch live. Their latest single, Hope describes how in life you don’t always feel in control, that you don’t fit. “You’re the support act, living in the background, when you really want to take that step forward and end up the star of your own life and write your own story.”

What is it about music that draws you in and where are KB Theory heading?
I love the ability to express yourself in a form that so many people can relate to. If I had the opportunity to make music my career full-time, I would jump at it.
At the moment we are writing new music and would like to start recording the demos soon. This music is taking a different direction and I’m excited to see how it turns out. There are some more elements of electronic pop coming up in this new crop of songs. We only have one gig left this year, but we’ll be starting up again next year and would like to do some gigs outside Brisbane too.

So how did you hear about Visible Ink?
KB Theory needed some posters printed for a gig. Up until this stage we’ve been printing and paying for them ourselves. Or just haven’t been having them as printing posters are too expensive. One of the guys in our band found out about Visible Ink and mentioned it to everyone. We made a phone call to find out how the space works and we’ve just sent off our first gig poster to be printed. We’re also heading to Little BIGSOUND, hosted by QMusic, after receiving tickets through Visible Ink’s Enterprise music and production programming.

What do you get up to in your down time? Do you have any hobbies?
Music is my down time. I’m constantly looking at ways I can improve current songs or writing riffs for the next song. I wish I’d learnt the saxophone when I was at school, but it’s never too late to learn anything, so I’ll keep you updated if I do that!

Is there any advice you would give young people wanting to start a band? Or any advice you wish you’d been given beforehand?
The advice I’d been given was network, network, network. Initially it didn’t make any sense to me, but now I see how important that piece of advice was.  But also, go see other bands and support them.
You just have to get out there and play. Once you’ve done it a couple of times it becomes so much easier to work out what to do next. Organisations like QMusic are a good source of information, and they run Industry Connect courses providing lots of help along the way.

Keep up to date with KB Theory’s upcoming gigs in the new year on their Facebook page and follow their travels on Instagram.

Girls Going Places – Young Entrepreneurs Panel

Girls Going Places is a female entrepreneurial panel night where three successful and creative female business owners will share and discuss their skills and experience in an entertaining and relaxed environment.

  • Georgia Press, owner of Barnu By Georgia is a 17 year old jewellery maker still completing high school,
  • Amanda Campeanu is an Instagram strategist who quit the corporate world to begin her own business venture Plush Content Co, and
  • Candice Darryl, an event and digital marketer for Venzin group who also has a side business, Vay Stay, selling fully recycled coffee scrubs.

Through an engaging panel discussion, question and answer segment, product displays and a lot of laughs this event will combine entertaining conversation, discussion and the ability for young women to network and learn from three engaging female panelists.

When: Tuesday 16 October 2018, 6pm-8pm
Where: Pawpaw Cafe, 898 Stanley Street East, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102
Cost: Free, RSVP via Eventbrite

If you RSVP to this event you are agreeing to the terms and condition including filming of the event and image taking. Please advise us directly if you do not wish to be filmed or photographed.

You can find out more about Girls Going Places on Facebook.

Creative Media Workshops this September

Visible Ink Enterprise is opening up the world of creative media this school holidays with five hands-on workshops hosted by Hot Chicks with Big Brains. Sign up today and develop some new skills in copywriting, design and pitching your ideas.

COPYWRITING FOR NEWBIES

So, you think you can’t write?
You don’t have to be a grammar-nazi or a writer by trade to string words together that work. We’re going to show you the value of good copywriting, delve into the thinking that’s typically behind good copy, and show you that – with the right attitude – anybody is capable of copywriting.

Saturday 29 September, 10am-12pm or Sunday 30 September, 4pm-6pm

INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN

What is design, if you’re not a designer?
A broad and overwhelming topic, that’s what! If you’d like a little help putting your floaties on and dipping your toes into the ‘design’ pool for the very first time, look no further. We’ll take you through what ‘design’ means to different people and in different industries, what it looks like in theory and in practice, communicating and rationalising, and the difference between having design as a skill and taking it up as a career.

Saturday 29 September, 4pm-6pm or Sunday 30 September, 10am-12pm

PITCHING FOR TOTAL BEGINNERS

Are you as fresh as the Prince of Bel-Air (to pitching)? Let’s change that.
Pitching an idea is a skill that almost everyone will use in their lifetime, whether it’s in front of a huge audience at an event, or just to your boss at work. We take fundamental approaches to pitching and building business relationships from industry leaders and funnel them down to the very basics for you, because starting at square one doesn’t mean that you can’t still learn from the best!

Wednesday 3 October, 6pm-8pm

All of these workshops are free and are suitable for young people 12-25 years of age. We have limited places at each session, so please email visibleinkvalley@brisbane.qld.gov.au with any enquiries and to confirm you place. They will be held at Visible Ink, 5 Green Square Close, Fortitude Valley.

Visible Ink takeover The POD: Ben Frost

Located on the Brunswick Street Mall emerging artists will activate The POD with Visible Ink support on Thursday 5 and Friday 6 July during the winter school holidays. Showcasing the best of Brisbane’s young musicians and performers this is a free event. We’d like you to meet some of the awesome talent gracing the stage and let them tell you about who they are and where they’re going.

Ben Frost is a Brisbane-based musician you’ve probably seen around the tracks, known for his chill approach to people and music. We asked him a few quick questions recently –

Q | What are you working on project-wise?
Currently, I am working on getting an album of songs I’ve written out into the world. I’m hoping to inspire people with my work, make them feel something positive through my music. I wanted to share how I see things with the world. I write songs and perform them. I love it because it’s a release from the struggles of life and a way to have a good time.

Q | How did you first get involved with Visible Ink?
I heard about Visible Ink through one of my colleagues. I like to drop in to Vis Ink because it’s a nice place to practice my music and interact with like-minded people.

Q | How have you got to where you are today?
I’m not really sure what led me to where I am today, but I know that I have a passion for music and a creative spirit and it’s those things that allure me to Visible Ink.

Q | What about opportunities? Have any advice?
For people just getting started in music, I would say keep going, don’t give up. If you get an opportunity to express who you are, and live the life you love, go for it.

In his spare time Ben likes to watch a good movie or learn about something new and different. You can catch him on Facebook or at around Brisbane’s live venues.

For the full lineup of performers at Visible Ink takeover The POD please check our Feed closer to the date.

As a part of Visible Ink takeover The POD, all performers are encourage to get involved with Visible Ink’s Enterprise program for professional development including supported opportunities to attend events such as Q Music’s Industry Connect or Little Bigsound, and participate in The QUBE Effect.

If you’re interested in finding out more about other artist that are a part of Visible Ink takeover The POD check out our Profiles page. For more information about music and production, Enterprise or Visible Ink please email visibleinkvalley@brisbane.qld.gov.au or call (07) 3403 0136.

Visible Ink takeover the Pod this July

Visible Ink will once again takeover The Pod this winter holidays with two days of free entertainment. Located on the Brunswick Street Mall, emerging artists will activate The Pod Thursday 5 and Friday 6 July, showcasing the best of Brisbane’s young musicians and performers. Line-up to be announced soon!

Announcing our new Developing Artist in Residence!

Each year Visible Ink offer opportunities for young and emerging artists to have space, resources and mentoring to develop their practice. The Developing Artist in Residence (DAIR) works closely with VI staff to curate exhibitions, facilitate workshops for other young people and produce their own works, showcasing them at various venues across Brisbane.

With that in mind, we’d love to introduce you to Skyler Castillo: artist, dabbler, and Visible Ink’s DAIR for 2018. Check out her interview on our Profiles page.

Emerging Visual Artists: Sam Bradley

As a part of Visible Ink’s Enterprise program, we support young and emerging visual artists to scale their work to suit large sites and submit an Expression of Interest. This year five young artists worked with Jugglers and Brightsiders to submit their EOI to Brisbane Canvas. They were successful in their designs being incorporated over two sites during the Brisbane Street Art Festival.

We’d like to introduce you to the artists that have turned out some amazing designs during this program, including Sam Bradley, who uses traditional signwriting techniques to create custom calligraphy and lettering.

You first got involved with Visible Ink through the Visible Ink Emerging Visual Artists (EVA) program, what was that like?

I really enjoyed the opportunity of working with The Brightsiders team (Jordan & Jordy) and Emily of Frank and Mimi fame. They were all extremely welcoming and made the whole project an important and valuable learning experience. The time spent spraying and brushing up the Jugglers driveway poured metho on my creative fire and painted my greymatter full colour.  It’s been surreal seeing these professionals work and teach up close, the techniques, tricks and attitude they taught will always be remembered.

I’d also like to thank everyone at Visible Ink and Jugglers Art Space (shoutout to Pete) for giving us a place to scribble and learn. And of course, a big thanks to Imogene Peach and Ashley Peel for their contributions and motivation in bringing our mural to life!

What are you currently working on, project-wise?

Currently I’m putting together a series of T-shirt screenprint designs for Velvet Couch Clothing, an Aussie streetwear company run by Gerard Ahrens who supports all kinds of creative talent worldwide.

What do you do and why did you choose to go down this path? 

I like to make original hand lettering focused design work combining traditional media with graphics programs. I also enjoy hand painted signwriting. There’s something about handmade letters that add a humanity to the work, no font licenses, the possibilities are endless and hopefully it can’t become obsolete when the robot overlords take over, ha ha!

What would you say led you to where you are today? 

I’ve enjoyed drawing and graphic design most of my life but didn’t get completely immersed until I saw a signwriter gold-gilding a sign at the pub next to a pizza shop I worked at. Now I’m just trying to get as skilled as possible, and make as many (arguably) beautiful things as possible until my inevitable demise. There’s so many talented artists painting walls in Brisbane and obviously on Instagram, that quality inspiration is everywhere you look.

Is there any advice you wish you’d been given before you started in this field? 

Just start drawing. I think a lot of people (myself included) are scared of being bad at something but the great people you see now just pushed through the self doubt of it. I’d recommend buying a ream of A4 paper, as many kinds of pens as you can and copy your favourite art styles as a reference. By the 500th sheet of paper you’ll probably have some good stuff. Also make sure you’re actually enjoying it and taking chances which will reflect in the work.

The best advice I’ve been given is to just keep working consistently and don’t compare yourself to others too much. Everyone has a unique style and once you harness that it’s a secret weapon – no one can do better.

What do you get up to in your down time? 

I love skating, cooking, stand up comedy, hanging out, mashing around town on a bicycle listening to heavy hip hop and learning old school signwriting techniques.

How would you suggest young people get involved in similar opportunities such as EVA?

Keep an eye out online by following your favourite artists locally and abroad, go to events in your city and visit Jugglers Art Space on a Saturday for a paint sesh.

Where can people get in touch with you?

I mostly post work at www.instagram.com/beradsdesign or www.berads.com, check it out y’all. Or if you want to meet Sam in person come along Sunday 15 April, 10am-4pm at Toombul Skatepark – 46 Parkland Street, Nundah – as a part of Brisbane Street Art Festival and funded by Brisbane Canvas to see his work.

Emerging Visual Artists: Lisa Tran Kelly

We’d like to introduce you to the artists that have turned out some amazing designs during this program, including Lisa Tran Kelly, a multi-disciplinary artist who utilises mediums such as pencil, ink, acrylics, oils and gold-leaf.

As a part of Visible Ink’s Enterprise program, we support young and emerging visual artists to scale their work to suit large sites and submit an Expression of Interest. This year five young artists worked with Jugglers and Brightsiders to submit their EOI to Brisbane Canvas. They were successful in their designs being incorporated over two sites during the Brisbane Street Art Festival.

 

You first got involved with Visible Ink through the Visible Ink Emerging Visual Artists (EVA) program, what was that like?

I had actually visited Visible Ink briefly a few other times as one of my friends volunteered there hosting workshops. I really enjoyed our time at Vis Ink for the program and found the rooms and materials available awesome. It’s a really inspiring space and making simple things like printing, scanning and art materials readily accessible to youth is a really fantastic idea that can help build the grounds for creative support and motivation. Knowing that I can access this place when I need to is something I’m very grateful to have in Brisbane and gives me a huge sense of hope for the future development of emerging artistic communities within the city.

The same goes for my experience with the EVA program. It was really valuable to have mentors taking us through elements of making Council-level applications and how to scale up our works. It was a great opportunity to be able to meet up with other like-minded emerging artists and work alongside them as well.

What are you currently working on, project-wise?

Currently I am working on a few different projects. I’m creating a mural with Brienne Aspinall for Brisbane Street Art Festival and have an upcoming group exhibition (“Art with Heart”) showcased at Juggler’s Art Space that will be raising funds for the Asylum Seeker Refugee Centre in the same month. So I am creating a series of paintings and gold-leaf wood blocks that represent the values of my Vietnamese heritage and the expectations and sacrifices made for me and my younger brother. As well as this, seeking to explore the extreme differences in lifestyles and times and generally the impact of experience that immigration and assimilation has on the persons involved and our broader Australian community.

What do you do and why did you choose to go down this path? What do you love about it?

I have an undergrad in Psychology and am currently completing my Masters in Social Work. I’ve always practised art on the side and have had opportunities to combine both interests plenty of times through an art residency with Brisbane City Council and work for the Queensland Eating Disorder Day program.  For work I am a disability support worker and occasionally fulfil speaking roles for The Eating Issues Centre.

While I love art and it is a huge focus in my life, in choosing what to study I have always wanted to use the privileges I have to learn skills and techniques to help the people most disadvantaged in society. I love building connections with others and making a positive difference in the community and hope to eventually build a career that combines artistic practise with these principles.

What would you say led you to where you are today?

Mental health and recovery are themes that go hand in hand with creativity so it can be a natural relationship. And while I’ve studied in the human services fields I feel like in many ways my non-art-related study has really driven my thirst for practising art as I’ve had to work hard to create and pursue artistic opportunities while still focusing on study, placements and support work roles. I have always been greatly inspired by my grandmother who is a brilliant artist and art teacher and who has taught me the value of practising art and immersing yourself in the world because with an artistic perspective beauty and meaning can be found within everything.

Is there any advice you wish you’d been given before you started in this field?

I think one of the biggest things that has come up in commissioning is determining pricing point as an emerging artist starting the first few big, important jobs. There isn’t a union that sets the minimum rate for producing an art work or large art job so I’ve struggled with pricing my work fairly and have finished a few jobs feeling exploited in the past. I’ve been lucky to have professional artists as friends and mentors who I can contact for guidance in this area but I wish I had been aware earlier of how to assert myself and had some better reference to inform my commission prices. I would definitely say before agreeing to a price on a large job to seek advice and perspective  from others in your industry.

What do you get up to in your down time? 

In my down time when I’m not studying or painting – music, playing Zelda, or being outdoors swimming in some body of water. I love playing music. I have a harp, electric guitar and ukulele I love to dabble with and an old piano I’ve played since I was seven.

How would you suggest young people get involved in similar opportunities such as EVA?

I suggest to look out for opportunities via ArtsGuide Brisbane, local galleries in your area and art universities. There are so many great opportunities out there it’s always worth getting involved and putting yourself out there.

Where can people get in touch with you? 

You can find my artworks @themoongallery on Instagram, on my website  lisatrankelly.wixsite.com/website or Facebook @themoongalleryartbylisa. Lisa’s upcoming mural as a part of Brisbane Street Art Festival and funded by Brisbane Canvas will be open for viewings Sunday 15 April, 10am-4pm at Sherriff Street, Petrie Terrace.

Emerging Visual Artists: Imogene Peach

As a part of Visible Ink’s Enterprise program, we support young and emerging visual artists to scale their work to suit large sites and submit an Expression of Interest. This year five young artists worked with Jugglers and Brightsiders to submit their EOI to Brisbane Canvas. They were successful in their designs being incorporated over two sites during the Brisbane Street Art Festival.

We’d like to introduce you to the artists that have turned out some amazing designs during this program, including Imogene Peach, Brisbane based artist and real life peach.

 

You first got involved with Visible Ink through the Emerging Visual Artists (EVA) program, what was that like?

The Emerging Visual Artists program was a super great experience. Having other artists want to lift you up like that is a true rarity in the art world and to have the fortune of such established and incredible artists there to support you and teach you their little secrets was incredibly uplifting and rewarding. I gained such great exposure, opportunities, and also learnt a lot of really valuable skills using new mediums, responding to artistic briefs and transforming works into large scale formats.

For anyone wanting to get involved with similar programs like Emerging Visual Artists I would suggest, look anywhere and everywhere for inspiration and opportunities, no matter how small or large. Humble beginnings are where all great things start. Instagram is also always a great place to network and share your artistic platform.

What are you currently working on, project-wise?

Currently I’m working on a show that explores my personal growth and struggles with gender identity, body image and performative femininity through experimenting with various iterations of the human form. It includes many portraits of friends of all identities and walks of life, using acrylic, markers and a little aerosol as my main mediums. It embraces the fluidity of the human form and experience. I also have had the incredible opportunity to work alongside some other amazing artists for the Brisbane Street Art Festival this year and will be completing a fun mural for them in April.

What do you do and why did you choose to go down this path? What do you love about it?

I have been producing art for a long time, but have only just found the confidence to embrace it fully after some tough times really made me realise creating is really when I feel the most comfy and myself. I currently do commission based works for a whole walk of different clients. The thing I love the most about this is the special connection you gain with someone by drawing them and the huge spectrum of different clients I paint for is always exciting as each work is something different to the one before- it really makes the whole experience fun and inspiring each time I get a job.

What would you say led you to where you are today?

I think what really led me to where I am now was through the power of positive thinking and mindfulness. I have a rough history with mental illness and found that the best way for me to express my tumultuous relationship with my brain was not so much through words, but with my hands, really getting in touch with what I love doing and holding on to that so tightly. Art has played a huge role in my recovery and still does everyday I pick up a pen or brush. The strength of other friends and the ones I love who have really been pushing it up hill and have come out on top has inspired me to take every opportunity I can and to always keep creating.

Is there any advice you wish you’d been given before you started in this field?

I think the best advice I have been given in regards to art is to believe in what you do and always do it with agency. Self doubt has always been my biggest obstacle, but listening to the positive feedback you’re receiving and accepting that you are deserving and worth this is a HUGE step in the right direction.

What do you get up to in your down time?

In my spare time (which I have a lot of) I love to annoy my cat, take care of my garden, craft anything and everything and enjoy the present with the ones I love.

 

You can get in touch with  with Imogene via Instagram at @imogenepeachart and also on Facebook by the same name. Or swing by and check out her mural work Sunday 15 April, 10am-4pm at Toombul Skatepark – 46 Parkland Street, Nundah – as a part of Brisbane Street Art Festival and funded by Brisbane Canvas.

Visible Ink takeover The POD

Visible Ink is once again taking over The POD on Brunswick Street Mall this April. As a part of Brisbane Youth Week we’ll be hosting some of the city’s finest emerging talent. Come along and check it out Thursday 12 and Friday 13 April.