Posts Tagged: copy + destroy

Nikki Nicnevin & Found Fashion

Found Fashion – a guide to second-hand shopping in Brissie – is a bright and quirky zine. Creator, Nikki started the project because they are passionate about bringing inclusive thinking into fashion and wearable art.

“Expressing yourself through your outfit shouldn’t be more difficult because of your looks or your budget.”

Why did you choose to create Found Fashion and what do you love about it? No matter what I’m working on, I thrive on the pride I feel when I look at a finished project and say, “I made this.” but this zine in particular is extra special to me since I’ve always wanted a career in fashion but could never afford to study after high school. I’ve modelled before at a professional level and have always loved dressing up, being in front of the camera.

It would bring me a lot of joy to rally some local young people as models for this project, especially those of marginalised identities, as I know first-hand how good it feels to look the way you feel inside.

Nikki first started swinging by Visible Ink in 2016, being bored and dropping in for their partner’s rehearsals. “Once I saw all the fantastic features available for FREE, I was completely hooked. Now I come here on my days off to indulge in self-led art therapy and to keep my creative side sharp.”

Is there any advice you wish you’d been given beforehand, before starting Found Fashion, or any creative project? Art is easy. We think it’s hard, but it’s not. Don’t judge your work in terms of ‘good’ or ‘bad’ art; everything you create does something good for your spirit! Also, if you’d like to model for me, I’d love to hear from you. No experience required – you’re eligible if you occupy a physical form! :)

In their downtime, you can find Nikki painting, baking, singing, writing, taxidermy, window-shopping, dog petting, etc. etc. – “I’m the kind of person who hates to waste a day off!” – or you can follow them on Instagram or Facebook @caointeach or Nikki Nicnevin. You can also see a digital version of Found Fashion.

Is there anything else you’d like to add? Thanks to the Vis Ink team for putting up with my weird (and usually barefoot) antics! <3

Library Support Call-Out

Copy and Destroy will be revamping as 2018 comes into full swing, with fresh look at how volunteers can help with the collective, and ways we can reward those who put in the extra effort
to keep Brisbane’s zine scene alive.

However, we know here that trying to get zine makers together can be a bit like herding cats, so we are offering individualised considerations for times people would be able to help and options of group work versus individual quiet work. Can only make it in during certain times that may not be during meetings or usual Library opening hours? We can arrange other time for you to contribute.

For those who are able to give their energies to the library further, they shall be rewarded with:

  • Extra printing privileges at Visible Ink (including extra sticker paper, colour printing, and coloured papers)
  • Food and drink while they put in those efforts
  • Resume referrals regarding work done
  • Exposure for their content creation works on the C+D Blog and Instagram
  • Invitation and priority for free Visible Ink workshops in 2018

The jobs that need to be done range from library administration to content creation. These include:

  • Categorising and inputing zines into the database
  • Cleaning and sorting Library display boxes
  • Cleaning and sorting zine making materials
  • Contributing feedback, ideas, and plan making regarding the Library
  • Developing a series of Instagram posts for promotion
  • Helping with Facebook posts
  • Writing zine reviews
  • Writing blog posts regarding the zine scene, personal stories regarding zine making, or other
    such stuff

If you’re interesting in joining in, or getting back on the Copy and Destroy train, email us at copyndestroy@gmail.com or DM us on the Copy and Destroy Instagram account.

Sober Bob

Sober Bob – sometimes known as Anne – is a young Brisbane creative, dabbling in various forms of design and independent media circulation. She runs her own design business, built off the back of a history of freelancing in IT.

Ibis

How did you hear about Visible Ink and why did you want to use our space?

I (Rhiana) heard about the space through a friend who suggested that we take advantage of the free printing on offer at Visible Ink.

We love the facilities and the support that we get from the staff, and the fact that such a space exists for the sole purpose of supporting young people and encouraging them to be creative and innovative. Overall, though, I’d say we’re in it for the free milo.

What are you currently working on project-wise?

We’re putting together our fourth issue (to be released on Christmas day, if all goes to plan), which entails organising our submissions, finalising our own inclusions and deciding on the look and feel we want for the issue. We’re also working on expanding our website and developing our new YouTube channel (IbisTV), so that we can display a broader range of content.

What do you do, why did you choose to go down that path, and what do you love about it?

We (myself, Jamie, Jack and Seamus) create and distribute a free zine called Ibis.

We all wanted a platform to showcase our own work and that of our friends and the wider community. We basically thought a free zine would be an awesome, inclusive way to encourage creativity, positivity, sharing and community in Brisbane. It’s also just really nice to dedicate time and attention to something that feels meaningful.

We love the freedom and the lack of constraint that comes with publishing our own zine – we have total creative freedom, can include and create whatever content we like, and we have a platform for our own work whenever we want it. We love receiving submissions, giving something to the community and the collaboration that working on the zine has brought us.

What would you say led you to where you are today?

I think we all love creating and sharing our work, and we’ve all been brought up to be very community minded. I’m about to graduate from a degree in creative and professional writing, Jamie’s graduating from a bachelor of journalism/history, Seamus studies visual arts and Jack studied animation, so the zine is a really practical way for us to gain experience in our chosen fields.

What do you get up to in your down time?

Jack does a lot of Simpson’s themed photoshopping; Seamus skates, surfs and creates for his visual arts degree at QUT; Jamie is learning calligraphy and his times tables; and I love watching movies, singing, dancing and eating (usually all at once).

Is there any advice you would give young people wanting to get involved/started in this field? Or any advice you wish you’d been given beforehand?

As our friend Shia Labeouf says: JUST DO IT. Making use of the free resources at Visible Ink is a great way to start out.

In terms of helpful advice I’d say… Make sure that you edit your zine really thoroughly before you distribute it. Also, try to be as organised as possible – keep tabs of all costs, numbers and anything that could possibly be important at a later date. Don’t just assume that you will remember it, because you probably won’t (or is that just me…?).

How would you suggest young people get involved? Or opportunities like this in Brisbane?

If you’d like to contribute to our zine, you can send your work to ibismagazine@gmail.com.

If you want to stay up to date with zine related events in Brisbane, check out the Zine and Indie Comic Symposium (ZICS) Facebook page, and if you’re interested in zines in general, I recommend paying a visit to Junky Comics in West End, which has a really cool collection of national and international zines and comics.

Is there anything else you’d like to add?

Where can people get in touch with you?

Email: ibismagazine@gmail.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/IBISzine/

Website: ibiszine.com