Posts Categorized: Young People Defining Brisbane

The UQ Wom*n’s Collective

Continuing a proud tradition of student feminism at UQ, the feminist collective behind the “Wom*news” zine are inviting people to get involved.  The dynamic foursome have fun and participate in Brisbane creative life through zine fairs, blogging and visiting Visible Ink to produce the zine. They tell us a bit more about their zine.

What do you do, why did you choose to go down that path, and what do you love about it?
Emma, Rosie, Lorelei and Laura make up the UQ Women’s Collective zine team for our feminist zine “Wom*news”. The Collective is a feminist group at the University of Queensland’s campus. We wanted to make a fun and creative space for the Collective’s members and friends to get their opinions out there on women’s issues, and thus our zine was born! We don’t receive any funding, so the zine is low key in terms of budget – which is why we have been using the printers at Visible Ink – but it’s big on awesomeness. We love that from such grass roots beginnings we’ve made Wom*news into something pretty prolific in the feminist-sphere. Articles from our zine have been featured the Down Under Feminists’ Carnival, and more recently, in UQ’s student magazine.

Emma is the editor, Rosie the website mod, Lorelei’s the designer and Laura rounds up the news in each published issue. It’s a collective effort where everyone is free and happy to pitch in to make the zine happen! Other members sometimes help with editing and submit the most amazing cover art for us to feature.
What are you currently working on project-wise?
We’re currently planning our stall for the Southside Tea Room Zine and Cartoon fair. We’re going to have a Polaroid photo campaign, as long as copies of Wom*news to grab for free. We’ll soon be calling for submissions for issue 10. Double digits, how exciting!
What would you say led you to where you are today? Eg background, achievements, inspiration?
We’re inspired by the work that other feminists do, and how little communities like the Women’s Collective can start something small and really make an impact. Feminist bloggers, and magazines like Bitch, are also something we love and aspire to be like!
What’s it like being a young person in Brisbane? What suggestions would you make to improve the city?
Brisbane is a pretty great place in terms of activism and having spaces to express yourself. We’d love to see more free and easily accessible printing and photocopying services available.
Where can people get in touch with you?
You can find all our past issues, and other cool articles at our website www.womynews.wordpress.com. If you’re a feminist in Brisbane and would like to be featured in Wom*news, or want to know more about the zine, you can contact us at uqwnews@gmail.com.

Alex Campbell

Alex Campbell

Alex Campbell is one of those people who just radiates. An active member of the Brisbane arts community, volunteering at 4ZZZ, working on a zine and playing in a popular band, Alex regularly comes in to use the Visible Ink space for projects. Running zine workshops, she also uses the space for printing and using The Arts Hub. With 15 issues of the zine she edits under her belt, we’re stoked we could track her down for an interview and ask her some questions about her motivations and passions.

What do you do, why did you choose to go down that path, and what do you love about it?
SLUBS ZINEI am the editor and one of the contributors of Slubberdegullion Magazine (Slubs Zine). The zine came about when I was living with a group of people in a big share house in early 2011 and we decided to start a house zine, featuring drawings and writings from friends of ours and reviewing and interviewing local bands.

It kind of got to be something bigger and we began to get other contributors and started distributing it in shops such as Atavist Books and The Time Machine in Nambour.

I love being involved in the zine because its so much fun to be creative with friends, making art, writing, hanging out with bands etc. It’s awesome to have an avenue to publish both our own work and that of our friends. It’s really great to have a platform to speak on and to raise awareness of things that matter to us happening in our community. I love meeting people who have collected all the issues or seeing emails in our inbox from readers saying what they loved/hated about the past issue.

What are you currently working on project-wise?
Currently we are gathering some stuff together to create Slubs Issue 15!

What would you say led you to where you are today? Eg background, achievements, inspiration?
A love of writing and collage! and discovering new music and bands, also my sister introduced me to zines when I was quite young and I loved the whole idea of them from the start.

What do you get up to in your down time? Do you have any hobbies?
GUNKI write music and poetry and play in an all girl punk band called GUNK. I also love going out to gigs and vegan cooking.

What’s it like being a young person in Brisbane? What suggestions would you make to improve the city?
In Brisbane, there definitely needs to be more avenues for young people to express themselves, more public art spaces, more government funding for small scale creative projects. I think there needs to be less of a focus on sport and more of a focus on the arts.

What advice or inspiration would you share with other young people?
Anyone can make art, anyone can make a zine, anyone can play music or write, regardless of background, education etc don’t let anyone tell you you can’t, everyone’s opinion of what is good is different, so don’t doubt yourself, or give up before you’ve even tried! You might be surprised what skills you can discover if you just give it a go.

Is there anything else you’d like to add? Where can people get in touch with you?
You can email us with questions and contributions at slubs_zine@hotmail.com and we can also post you a copy of the zine.

If you want to be notified of events or when new issues are coming out, check out our Facebook page. Otherwise pick up a copy at Atavist Books in Winn Lane.

Bee Peever-Morgan

bee peever morgan

bee peever morganWhat do you do, why did you choose to go down that path, and what do you love about it?
I am a singer/song-writer, poet, story-teller and social justice advocate. This path chose me more or less – it wasn’t really any choice I had. I was singing as soon as I found out that my words could run longer and I found words coming really easily to me. My social justice advocacy was dawned on me during high-school when I felt deep within myself that I couldn’t sit by and let people suffer without at least speaking up.

What are you currently working on project-wise?
I am currently in a social-justice alternative rock band called “The Change”. We sing about things that really mean something to us from Human Trafficking to poverty to depression to bullying to self-esteem. We are devoted to letting people know we want to help them, and that they aren’t alone. This really ties in with my love of human rights, social justice, creative writing and music and that just makes me really happy. I’m always really interested to learn about new charities and organisations that exist for the purpose of helping people- such as “Hope Movement” whose founder I had the ultimate pleasure of meeting at a music festival. I love their purpose and their vision… AND their merch!

the change

The Change, a social-justice alternative rock band.

What would you say led you to where you are today? Eg background, achievements, inspiration?
I have heaps of things that led me to where I am. One blessing after another, a million lessons learnt through failure and a passion so strong I couldn’t ignore it even if I wanted to; which I don’t. I’m hopeful for change and truly optimistic about the positive impact the world will see.

What do you get up to in your down time? Do you have any hobbies?
In my down time I drink copious amounts of coffee (which really isn’t all that different to my busy times). Not only that but I love going to and helping out with my church’s events and services, getting more involved in my community and travelling. I have this epic hunger for travel that never seems to be satisfied no matter where I go. I’m ridiculously blessed to have the ability to travel and I will go far and wide to help people and play music.

What’s it like being a young person in Brisbane? What suggestions would you make to improve the city?
Being a young person in Brisbane is actually really good. I wasn’t born here- I was born in a rural, far-northern Queensland town and from there moved to multiple places down the state before settling in Brisbane. Seeing the different lifestyles of the communities I’ve been a part of has really inspired me to get everything out of what is offered to me. Brisbane is so full of life and culture and an incredibly diverse range of people. The only improvements I can think of really are a lowering in public transport prices, cleaner streets and more cheap recording studios.

What advice or inspiration would you share with other young people?
I wouldn’t even know where to start. Be yourself really. Find what makes you happy, work on it, develop it, put it into practice  Singing, dancing, computing, ANYTHING- just make sure you don’t hate where you are or what you do because that will make you unhappy. Never give up on doing something you love- persistence and perseverance are key.

Is there anything else you’d like to add? Where can people get in touch with you?
Twitter is probably my best form of communication so if you feel so inclined, hit me up on there. Other than that- have a beautiful day.

http://www.twitter.com/bleex_

Jordan Schulte

jordan-schulte

“I’ve been doing comedy for a few years now and it’s the most fun and frustrating thing I’ve ever done. There’s no real impressive story as to how I got into it, when I was a kid I would watch comics do short sets on Rove or The Footy Show or shows like that, and it just seemed really fun and easy to do. Then the Melbourne Comedy Gala would show on TV and there would be all these different types of comedians, different styles, different sort of acts from all over the world, showing me that you can make people laugh in more ways than one. And that’s another cool thing about comedy, the fact that anyone – young/old, male/female, big/small, any ethnicity, any cultural background, whatever – can do comedy. And be amazing at it.”

I’ve had people tell me I’m bloody hilarious and some people tell me to quit because I suck.

I’ve had lots of good gigs and just as many bad gigs. I’ve had people tell me I’m bloody hilarious and some people tell me to quit because I suck. I’ve shared the stage with some big names, performed in comedy festivals, performed in backyards at birthday parties, done gigs in the city and rural Queensland, been interviewed on radio. One night I smash a gig in front of 300 people and the next night I bomb hard in front of 3. I’ve even had to follow a burlesque stripper routine at a show once. It’s a very tough and challenging pursuit, it takes years until you can get paid to do it and call it your full time job, but that’s the thing about it that kinda drives me, the fact that all the hard work will – eventually – pay off big time. At least that’s what I tell my Mum.

 

What are you currently working on?

I’m in a show at the Brisbane Comedy Festival called “Super Happy Fun Time” with some other comedian friends. It’s our third year doing a show at the Festival, and we’re really keen on this year’s show because last year we had a lot of sketches and theatrical aspects that we worked into a narrative, which worked well and we really enjoyed but for this year’s show we decided to just cut all the fancy-pants gimmicks and get back to what we love to do – just good straight stand-up. We’ve all been gigging constantly on the Brisbane comedy circuit for the past year or so so it will be interesting to see how we’ve all progressed as comics since the last show. Oh gosh, I hope I’m good.

As for why we gave the show that title, well I guess you’ll just have to come along to find out.

 

What would you say led you to where you are today?

After finishing school (Thank God) I moved to Brisbane to study acting, as well as finally giving stand-up a go. I moved from my small home town in country Queensland, where you can’t really have a good career unless you wanted to follow up something in rural outback country stuff. I guess that’s a sign it wasn’t for me, the fact that I call it ‘rural outback country stuff’.

All I wanted to do was act, perform, comedy etc so I was keen to move to the big city and see what it has to offer (turns out, a whole lot more than the country). I was that kid in class always trying to be funny and making jokes. I guess the performing arts has always been the business that I wanted to be a part of, so among all the joke writing and school plays I also performed with acoustic guitar for a while, I still do occasionally.

Performing is fun. I think it’s an art that takes a while to master, and all that comes with it, the experience, the gigging, and even the theory is the most interesting thing to me, so I’m inspired by what professionals have to say about it from all over the spectrum, whether it be comedy, acting, music, or whatever.

 

What do you get up to in your down time? Do you have any hobbies?

Sleep. Honestly I don’t know why but lately I’ve been napping more and more at odd times of the day.

But apart from that I play guitar, and occasionally write songs. I recently have gotten back into gaming, which I proudly avoided for years but I guess that’s what happens when your flatmate leaves his Xbox in the living room.

Watching movies, eating, reading about stuff online. I guess they’re not really hobbies but more just me describing what I do when I’m procrastinating/being lazy. Sorry.

I also tend to hang out with friends a lot, like going to see a movie or lunch or even just talking and hanging around the city. Oh man, now that I think about it I should get a real hobby, like model airplanes or kite flying.

What’s it like being a young person in Brisbane? What suggestions would you make to improve the city?

Brisbane is great, I really do enjoy living here. I think it has a great arts and culture scene and there’s always new places (bars, restaurants) popping up around town to go check out. It’s good because whenever I’m with friends and we get bored, there’s always something we can do.

 

What advice or inspiration would you share with other young people?

On whatever path you take, be willing to learn and embrace all the new experiences. Take in everything you can from everyone you meet, everything you see and do, and just remember that every bit of knowledge will make you a better person tomorrow.

Get In Touch With Jordan:

Jordan runs a comedy room for teenagers called “Young Blood Comedy” which does regular shows at Visible Ink in Fortitude Valley. Like them on Facebook.

Catch Super Happy Fun Time this Saturday 23rd March at The Brisbane Powerhouse.

Alisa Newey

alisa newey

Alisa Newey is a Brisbane designer with the philosophy, “making sustainability beautiful”.

Her work combines reclaimed materials and unique sculptural forms. Alisa is a new face in furniture design, having started out in Architecture before completing her Masters in Visual Arts/ Design at The Griffith University Queensland College of Arts in July 2012.

Alisa has worked on projects in Architectural Design, Fashion, Furniture and Exhibition Design. She has a passion for creating and enjoys a ‘hands on’ approach to design which involves sketching, constructing small models and scale prototypes right through to manufacturing finished prototypes. Alisa works in the workshop one day each week with a local designer/ maker to experiment with materials and prototype new products.

Emerge Home

Emerge is Alisa’s first large scale furniture piece, and is currently receiving a lot of attention in design circles throughout Australia.

Emerge is Alisa’s first large scale furniture piece and was displayed as finalist in The EDGE Design Competition at The Australian International Furniture Fair. Alisa is currently prototyping a “little sister” to the Emerge stand which will be, “a solution for hanging the clothes which clutter up the back of our desk chair”.

Get in Touch With Alisa:

Studio: Old Made Creative
Web: www.oldmade.com.au
Email: alisanewey@gmail.com
Phone: 0415199466

Ben Bennett

Ben Bennett

What do you do, why did you choose to go down that path, and what do you love about it?
I’m doing Year 10 at TAFE at the moment, and working as a hairdressing assistant. I also volunteer with Open Doors – Lesbian Gay Bisexual Trans (LGBT) Youth Service. I was unable to complete normal school due to health issues. I learnt business skills i.e customer service and now work as a peer mentor for new and existing clients. I think of Open Doors as a home away from home. I first went there when I was 13, and have been going to Open Doors who work with me on my Gender Identity. Everyone here is friendly and gets along. It feels like a big extended family.

What are you currently working on?
I am completing year 10 and starting a business degree at TAFE. My goal at the end is to own and manage a pub. I would like to travel – Europe – I’m interested in seeing Europe and visiting family.

What would you say led you to where you are today?
My friends have really helped me to get to where I am today, they’re so supportive and accepting of my gender identity. I first thought that I was trans when I was 13, but buried it due to fears of bullying but after a few years come to the realisation that I could not keep living as a female and have been a lot happier presenting as male. (Presenting is dressing as a male and passing as a male within the community.)
I won the Open Doors Youth Service award last year for being a friendly face and a great mate to other young people who identify as LGBT and/or sexually or gender diverse within Brisbane.
When I won the award I felt surprised and happy. I just did not expected it. I just believe doing what I do should be done no matter who the person is?
My sister is my inspiration as she is the most well-adjusted person within my family. I look up to her because she is responsible, caring and one of the smartest people I know. She has achieved a great OP score at school and won some awards during her graduation at University. She is now teaching English and history at a high school. She is really supportive of me … all of me.

What do you get up to in your down time? Do you have any hobbies?
I love drawing, I draw people, anime and cartoons. I read fantasy and auto-biographies – the last book I read was Lord of the Rings. I really enjoy reading those genres, they help me travel on public transport. I can just put my head down, and don’t have to talk to any of the other bus passengers.

What’s it like being a young person in Brisbane? What suggestions would you make to improve the city?
It’s pretty good, there is still a lot to do and a lot to see especially if you are poor. I’d recommend visiting Southbank or the Queensland Museum, or you could visit West End and other boutique suburbs and window shop.
To improve the city public transport should be cheaper, it’s really expensive.

What advice or inspiration would you share with other young people?
Your life is your own to do what you like with it, and you shouldn’t let other people tell you in what direction you have to go. There’s no hurry to decide what you want to do with your life – it’s stupid to decide what you’ll be doing for the rest of your life when you’re 17/18 and just leaving school. It’s hard to know what you want instantly, so take your time.

Ryan Johnson

Ryan Johnson

What do you do, why did you choose to go down that path, and what do you love about it?

I am currently working in fast food (not as fun!). But in my spare time I do make-up for friends and family. I am also a Drag Baby (newbie drag queen). I chose to become involved in doing makeup and drag because since I was little I’ve always been fascinated with this kind of thing. Thanks to the many people I have around me I have found the courage to follow what I have always loved. I really love doing people’s makeup. It’s such a rewarding feeling when you have done something good for them. They start to feel good about themselves and the best reward is seeing them enjoying being themselves. I LOVE performing and so doing drag really puts all my passions in one basket.

What are you currently working on project-wise?
I am working on many different performance pieces and also trying to get into a makeup school to reach my goal of being a makeup artist.

What led you to where you are today?
Firstly my mother has always been there beside me every step of the way. My friends have also been really loving and supportive. I think having the Open Doors youth service and their guidance has helped me in the best ways possible too.

What do you get up to in your down time? Do you have any hobbies?
I dance, draw anime, read, hang in the CBD/Southbank with friends and just chill where ever I please. My hobby at the moment would have to be belly-dancing. I love doing it, and it’s an awesome work out.

What’s it like being a young person in Brisbane? What suggestions would you make to improve the city?
It has not been easy in the past but as times are changing people can be themselves in public. For me this means I can feel like ME when I leave the house and don’t have to put on my “mask” to hide who I am. Organisations like Open Doors and other youth services around Brisbane can be really helpful because having a group you belong to is great for being a young person in Brisbane.

What advice or inspiration would you share with other young people?
I really believe you should never give up no matter what. It may be hard now but if you close your eyes and shut out the world how can you see the light coming up? I also think you should be yourself and if your group of friends don’t like it then they are not worth your time or energy. Just put your energy into finding people like yourself and then have fun with your new friends.

Is there anything else you’d like to add? Where can people get in touch with you?
just like to say that being young in this time and age when everything is about to change is amazing and we all need to do is just let time show us the way to whatever life has in store for us and use it as a lesson to learn from as we are always learning. If anyone wants to get in touch with me they can reach me through Facebook or email me at ryan.jay18@hotmail.com.au

Tabz Lee

The Hive

Tabz Lee works at The Hive, an all ages venue at the Fortitude Valley PCYC. Tabz is about to enter into year 12 at Music Industry College. She gives us an insight into her work and what she loves about music and Brisbane.

What do you do, why did you choose to go down that path, and what do you love about it?
I help run an all ages music venue in Fortitude Valley called The Hive.

I chose to go down this path because I have always loved music, and plan to be a venue manger when I’m older. I like this career because I get to combine my two favourite things: business, and music.

I love being able to get a wide range of real life experience working for The Hive, including bookings, sound tech, stage management, and photography and film. As well as being able to see and work with some rad bands.
What are you currently working on project-wise?
Currently we’re working on making The Hive bigger and better next year, by updating equipment and training new staff. As well creating a website and booking both local and national artists.
What would you say led you to where you are today? Eg background, achievements, inspiration?
My parents have influenced me a lot with the business side of things, with both of them running their own business. Also in my early high school years I had a great guitar teacher as well as a great business teacher, both of which always pushed me and encouraged me to achieve my best. In year 11 I begun attending Music Industry College which helped me significatly by giving me a huge head start in my career. The Hive is also run by the school, which is how I began working there.
What do you get up to in your down time? Do you have any hobbies?
My down time is just mostly listening to music. I am really into hardcore, especially Parkway Drive, Northlane, Midnight in Alaska and Prepared Like A Bride. I don’t really have any main hobbies, but I skate, play soccer, and do motocross when I get the chance.
What’s it like being a young person in Brisbane? What suggestions would you make to improve the city?
It’s pretty good being a young person because there is generally a lot to do, especially in the inner city area. All though the music scene isn’t the best, its still great compared to a lot of other places.

The only great down fall is the it isn’t the best city for all ages music.
What advice or inspiration would you share with other young people?
I would encourage other young people to get involved in the music scene. Even though a lot of parents think it’s dangerous to go out to events, it is actually supporting creativity and music in our city. It’s really hard for musicians to make a living, so by us going out and supporting them.

A lot of all ages venues in Brisbane are safe spaces and drug & alcohol free. The Hive is a really good example of this. We have a policy against discrimination, we have security, and we keep prices really cheap so that young people can get involved. We also give kids a good chance to get involved by offering work experience to school students.

If you want to come into The Hive we would show you how to do some of the event management tasks we do at The Hive including basic sound production, security, door sheet and management, and just giving you a feel of what The Hive is about.

Interested in learning more about The Hive? 

Get in touch via their Facebook page:  http://www.facebook.com/livethehive

Or email them now: liveatthehive@live.com.au

Distant Memories

An indie rock band from Brisbane, Distant Memories have encountered problems finding appropriate venues to perform in. While they’ve got friendship, adventure and music on their side, the year 9 students are looking for some support to get a stronger all ages scene happening for bands like themselves.

What do you do, why did you choose to go down that path, and what do you love about it?
We are a band that loves to play indie/rock. We just love playing music together. Being able to chill with friends and play music with them is a great opportunity. We all wanted to go down a musical path somehow so when we all joined together to form this band it was like everything just fit in place both musically and being all friends already it just sank in for us.

What are you currently working on project-wise?
We have just released one of our songs as a demo which you can hear here and are currently working on writing some more songs and trying to put an EP together hopefully soon. We are also working on trying to get some gigs which then we can showcase these songs.

What would you say led you to where you are today? Eg background, achievements, inspiration?
We have all grown up with music somehow whether through getting lessons at school or teaching ourselves. We’ve all learnt some sort of music. But instead of being kids who are learning music and don’t enjoy it, we apply all our knowledge together in this band. This means that our music is both creative and musically fitting.

Distant Memories

What do you get up to in your down time? Do you have any hobbies?
Nat – I usually play some drums and listen to some of my favorite bands which influence me to play – Anberlin. I also like to play piano and some guitar. I also play football (soccer) in my downtime. I also like to chill with my friends.
Jordan D – I like to play my bass in my downtime but I also like to play video games and chill with my friends.
Cam – I enjoy making any type of music from just playing my guitar to playing some piano and just making some demo recording songs. I also enjoy many sports such as soccer, league and AFL. I also like to chill with friends.
Jordan M – I like to play my guitar, play video games and also like to chill with friends.

What’s it like being a young person in Brisbane? What suggestions would you make to improve the city?
It’s adventurous, but it would be really great if there were more places like Visible Ink that support young kids and the arts.

What advice or inspiration would you share with other young people?
Stick to your dreams and pursue them. If you do your best in everything good things will come out of it.

Is there anything else you’d like to add? Where can people get in touch with you?

People can look us up on:

The Leftovers

Name

The Leftovers

Website

The Leftovers

Email

left.overs@live.com.au

How Did You Hear About Visible Ink?

Word of Mouth

What do you do, why did you choose to go down that path, and what do you love about it?

‘The Leftovers’ is a collective of four actors and musicians: Thomas Hutchins, Jordan Kadell, Jessica Smith, and Michael Whittred. The four graduated from an Advanced Diploma of Arts (Acting) at Southbank Institute of Technology between 2011 and 2012. Their time at the course inspired the inception of The Leftovers, something between a theatre company and a band.

What are you currently working on project-wise?

Leftovers (From a Dream), the company’s debut creation, will appear in FAST festival at La Boite, Kelvin Grove this year. This out of tune play with songs explores the addictive nature of lucid dreaming, with funky alarm clocks, stylized movement and live music. There are no microphones, no recorded sound and no projection. Leftovers (From A Dream) relies solely on four performers, a few instruments, eight lights, and a torch.

The show has had two development showings in 2011 and was deemed a success. “Beautiful, keep the violent rawness” – anonymous.

What would you say led you to where you are today? Eg background, achievements, inspiration?

We do it because nothing else makes sense.

Locally, the group are inspired by a number of Brisbane/Australian artists including Lisa O’Neill, Norman Price, Christine Johnson, Peter Nelson, Brian Lucas, Steven Mitchell-Wright (The Danger Ensemble), Dan Evans, The Kransky Sisters, Fleur-Elise Noble, Rosie Dennis, Black Lung Theatre, The Escapists and many more.

What do you get up to in your down time? Do you have any hobbies?

All members have an extensive musical background including weekly singing lessons for three years. Jessica is a classically trained violist and Michael is a prominent force in the Brisbane music scene, performing live gigs with his bands: Papperbok (drummer) http://www.facebook.com/pages/Papperbok/112280188801571?sk=wall and The Worriers (guitarist and vocalist) http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Worriers/353945477965358?sk=wall .

What’s it like being a young person in Brisbane? What suggestions would you make to improve the city?

Places like Visible Ink are an oasis for young artists, but there simply aren’t enough of them. More funding from the Arts, especially in the form of performance and touring grants would greatly benefit Brisbane’s youth.

What advice or inspiration would you share with other young people?

An eye out for oppurtinities, blinking them up, and an eye burning your own into the wall. Leave a mark.

Is there anything else you’d like to add? Where can people get in touch with you?

The Leftovers